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Magnesium Reduces Inflammation

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Dr. Elizabeth Cantrell

In April 2014 a meta-analysis (a study that includes findings from many different studies) looked at the relationship between magnesium intake and C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a substance made by the liver and released into the bloodstream in response to tissue injury and inflammation. An elevated CRP level is identified with a simple blood test and is considered a non-specific indicator for disease. Studies suggest that over time prolonged low-level inflammation can lead to many serious diseases including heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and even some forms of cancer. Knowing this association, a primary focus of treatment of these diseases should be decreasing inflammation.

In this particular study, researchers analyzed over 30,000 individuals included in 7 different studies. In the original studies the participants’ dietary magnesium intake was assessed along with a blood test measuring CRP using high sensitivity techniques. The high sensitivity technique (hs-CRP) is a measure of inflammation in blood vessels and is the test needed to help establish heart disease risk.

After analyzing data the researchers found that the individuals with the highest magnesium intake had the lowest hs-CRP levels. Conversely, those with the lowest magnesium levels had the highest hs-CRP levels. These findings suggest that higher magnesium intake is associated with decreased vascular inflammation, as evident by the lower hs-CRP values.

This information stresses the importance of consuming a diet rich in magnesium. Green leafy vegetables (e.g. spinach), legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, are good sources. In general, foods containing dietary fiber also contain magnesium.

If you suffer with symptoms of inflammation, such as joint pain, skin rashes or breakouts, high blood pressure, blood sugar imbalance, fatigue or weight gain, join us for our 4th Annual Clean Body Cleanse starting Monday, January 12th. This 21-day program focuses on a magnesium-rich, plant- based diet to reduce total body inflammation.

Dibaba DT, Xun P, He K. Dietary Magnesium Intake is Inversely Associated with Serum C-reactive Protein Levels: Meta-analysis and Systematic Review. European journal of clinical nutrition 2014;68(4):510-516. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2014.7.


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